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Fall 2018 Courses

CMLIT 004: Introductions to Asian Literatures:

This course is designed to act as a gateway to Asian literatures and cultures—in English translation—of selected fictional and cinematic texts from Japanese, Chinese, Korean, and Asian diaspora literature (our main focus is on literature of modern Asia, and Japanese literature). Exploring the historical and cultural contexts of each work, we will pay attention to the ways in which each text depicts the diversities within geographical areas. The cross/inter-cultural approach used in this course invites students to acquire a global perspective on the rich traditions of Asian literatures, films, and cultures. T R 12:05-1:20 Reiko Tachibana

CMLIT 010: World Literatures:

This course is an introduction to World Literature and includes the reading and interpretation of selected works of literature from diverse parts of the world. This class helps you discover the connections between literatures created in different geographies. These connections will aid you in considering the universality of themes such as power, gender, heroism, globalization, and encounter with the foreign.  We will trace world in seven areas:  Indic, East Asian, Mediterranean, African, European, Nordic and Americans spheres. T R 10:35-11:50 Charlotte Eubanks, M W F 10:00-11:00 Flora Shao, M W F 12:20-1:10 Ivana Ancic

CMLIT 011: The Hero in World Literature:

Traditional heroes, their traits and adventures; typical themes and examples chosen from the epics and sagas of world literature. M W F 2:30-3:20 Sarah Davis

CMLIT 012: Introduction to World Drama and Performance:

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements.Introduction to World Drama will enable students to discover the power and excitement of drama in a global context. Students will encounter a variety of cultural contexts as they observe how playwrights portray local histories and lifestyles, in settings from many parts of the world. The course will offer (1) an introductory overview of concepts and terms associated with understanding drama. It will present (2) traditional dramatic forms such as tragedy, comedy, history play, allegory, Noh, etc., as seen in plays prior to the twentieth century; and (3) recent dramatic forms such as testimonial, other politically engaged plays, drama online or on film, etc., as seen in plays from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Attention will be given to (4) the dramatic contributions of multiple cultural groups in the U.S., with African American, Asian American, Latino, and other U.S. plays seen not in isolation, but in relation to world drama. Finally, (5) the course will consider ways in which drama, as a form of world literature, can have an international and intercultural impact, both in earlier periods (for example, the ancient Sanskrit play “Shakuntala,” from India, influenced the German writer Goethe’s play “Faust” in the nineteenth century) and recently, when global circulation and international collaboration are increasingly frequent. Class work will include lectures or presentations by the instructor, presentations by students, web based activities, and focused discussions. Where feasible, attendance at one or more live theatrical performances will be encouraged. M W F 11:15-12:05 Danielle Netzer

CMLIT 100: Reading Across Cultures:

This course offers a survey of several different cultural traditions as expressed in myth, as well as discussion of myth in its literary, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts. Various theories of the evolution and analysis of myth will be examined. Mythological traditions from around the globe will be compared in order to determine qualities which they share and examine ways in which they are unique. This course will help you see the world in new and exciting ways, based on the wide variety of global myths. At the same time, you will consider the permanent human issues which connect all of these traditions to each other, to the modern world, and to you. T R 1:35-2:50 Nergis Erturk Lennon

CMLIT 101: Race, Gender, and Identity in World Literature:

This course examines issues of race, gender, religions, and ethnicity as expressed in literary, social, and cultural contexts. We will address these questions in works from a variety of traditions and time periods. Literary works from around the world show a wide range of response to the Other -- idealization of difference as exotic, fear of difference as threat, the desire to suppress difference or force it into conformity, the recognition of difference within ourselves, etc. The scope includes authors who are themselves members of racial, sexual or ethnic groups with which you may be less familiar. You will also consider the question of who and what constitutes identity as perceived by oneself and by others. M W F 10:10-11:00 Shuang Shen

CMLIT 105: The Development of Literary Humor:

One of the most important trends of our time is the increasing emphasis on globalization. This course offers an international, intercultural approach to the study of literature, crossing the boundaries of time, place, nationalities, languages, and cultures. The range of literature taught in Comparative Literature as a discipline draws from every continent of the globe and from the ideas, experiences, and inspiration of women and men across thousands of years. With an entire world of literature to choose from, the content of the course varies with the expertise and interests of the faculty member. Each seminar focuses on a specific topic that highlights the nature of literary study and research, presents debates in the discipline, and opens the way to further investigations. T R 10:35-11:50 Adam Faircloth

CMLIT 106: The Arthurian Legend:

This course is designed to familiarize students with the legends about and surrounding King Arthur and the Round Table fellowship. Through a series of readings, students will survey the development of the legends of Arthur from their beginnings in early medieval Europe to their modern adaptations in many cultures around the world. The Arthurian legend is an ideal vehicle for showing the ways in which literary works capture and express changing value systems in different cultural and historical situations, and thus the course is a good example of comparative (international) approaches to literary study. Classes will discuss the changing cultural' ideals represented, the different characterizations of the central figures, and the literary, techniques employed. Lectures and discussions will be supplemented by music, and films dealing with Arthurian themes. M W F 12:20-1:10 Theodore Chelis

CMLIT 107: Exploration, Travel, Migration, and Exile:

Compares the literatures of travel and exploration from ancient times to the future, from narratives of journeys actually experienced through narratives of journeys imagined in the mind. The notion of the journey is broadly defined as encompassing both literal and metaphorical experiences, including travel journals and diaries, epic adventures, quests of introspection, dreams and visions, and depictions of the future. You will examine and compare the different roles that travel can play in the imaginations of both the individual writers and the cultures from which they come. The journeys of this course, which vary greatly from each other, will also allow you to consider some of the vast unknowns of the individual human mind and imagination. M W F 11:15-12:05 Molly Appel

CMLIT 108: Myths and Mythology:

This course offers a survey of several different cultural traditions as expressed in myth, as well as discussion of myth in its literary, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts. Various theories of the evolution and analysis of myth will be examined. Mythological traditions from around the globe will be compared in order to determine qualities which they share and examine ways in which they are unique. This course will help you see the world in new and exciting ways, based on the wide variety of global myths. At the same time, you will consider the permanent human issues which connect all of these traditions to each other, to the modern world, and to you. M W 4:00-5:15 Justin Halverson, M W F 2:30-3:20 Peter Wolf

CMLIT 122: Global Science Fictions:

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements.A course on science fiction and the fictions of science from an international and interdisciplinary perspective. Includes a history of the idea of science, of its engagement with and by fictional, filmic, dramatic, and poetic narratives, within an explicitly comparative framework that includes material from Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa. Students will develop a theory of genre and its development over time; they will recognize regional, cultural, and historical differences and forms of change that affect the intellectual development of the arts and sciences. They will practice and master these skills through class discussion, short papers, and/or quizzes and exams. M W F 9:05-9:55 Elizabeth Schoppelrei

CMLIT 130: Banned Books: International and Comparative Perspectives:

This course examines one of the most documented events in the history of book reception— the banning of books. Bannings provide a useful window onto the myriad functions of culture in social identity formation. In order to understand how and why offense is given and taken, students will learn to place texts in a specific context of their historical production and reception and also to extrapolate connections between disparate moments when taboos were named. Incorporating examples from a range of global systems of censorship, the course examines differences in the modes and effects of repression and the sometimes surprising connections between church and monarchy, fascism and democracy. This course raises the following questions:-How has censorship been justified? When, if ever, is censorship justifiable?-Who censors? Who is censored? M W F 10:10-11:00 Alex Fyfe

CMLIT 131: Crime and Detection in World Literature:

This course studies the origins and development of crime and detective literature from an international and interdisciplinary perspective. Beginning with early Greek tragedies, the course traces literature's investment in issues of crime, violence, detection, forensics, and social justice through a variety of historical and cultural contexts; this may include the classical era, the early modern period, the Enlightenment, the industrial era, and the modern/ contemporary world. Some of the questions addressed may include reigning myths about law and order; the rise of urban societies and mass culture; the construction of the detective figure, the witness, the criminal, and the victim as models of subjectivity; issues of gender and sexual violence; and the nature of justice. Students will learn about the history of the idea of crime and its relationship with literary form. They will develop ideas about the contribution of literary thinking to ideas of social justice, as well as a theory of genre and its development over time; they will recognize regional, cultural, and historical differences and forms of change that affect the intellectual development of literature and detection alike. They will practice and master these skills through class discussion, short papers, and/or quizzes and exams. T R 1:35-2:50 Ian Thompson

CMLIT 142: The Psychology of World Literature:

The Psychology of World Literature (3) (GH;IL) (BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements.This course explores various psychological approaches to the discussion of literature from the perspectives of writer, narrative, character and reader. Can authors, narrators, and fictitious characters be "psychoanalyzed"? To what extent do cultural variants affect a psychological approach to literature? Are there psychological universals that transcend time and culture? How does a an awareness of psychology affect the reader? All of these issues will be discussed and compared with an eye to speculating the ways in which the human mind creates literature and literature impacts the human mind. T R 9:05-10:20 James Kopf

CMLIT 143: Human Rights and World Literature:

Human Rights refers to basic rights and freedoms to which all humans are entitled, often held to include the right to life and liberty, freedom of thought and expression, and equality before the law. Some scholars believe that without certain forms of literature today’s understanding of human rights would not exist. Through comparative analysis of a variety of human rights storytelling genres that reflect a range of contexts, this course will suggest that it is impossible to understand human rights without also thinking about the stories that create and sustain their idea. One main premise of this course is that the representation of human rights violations is always a vexed undertaking. T R 12:05-1:20 Rosemary Jolly

CMLIT 153: International Cultures: Film and Literature:

This course will compare narrative and artistic techniques employed by literature and film in portraying different social and cultural environments, which will range widely around the globe. The purpose of this course is to have you examine how the selected artists have developed their intentions and their subject matter in their respective medium, literature or film, and to allow you to study modes of narration across different cultures and media. You will examine how narrative components, including plot, genre, environment, character, and point of view are developed in films and fiction from diverse cultures. The study of narrative technique will help students develop analytical skills in discussing and writing about the literary and cinematic expression of cultural values. M W F 1:25-2:15 Henry Morello

CMLIT 184: The Short Story:

Lectures, discussion, readings in translation, with primary emphasis on major writers of the nineteenth and twentieth century. T R 10:35-11:50

CMLIT 191N: Introduction to Video Game Culture:

Introduction to Video Game Culture (3) This course is a comparative introduction to the nature and history of video games as cultural artifacts, from Pong to online role-playing. It introduces students to academic discussion on and creative work in new digital forms including hypertexts, video games, cell phone novels, machinima, and more. Students will survey major debates over the meaning and value of video games, and study some of the major theoretical terms and perspectives developed to elaborate the cultural and sociological value of video games. The course extends students' skills in literary interpretation to a variety of new objects, and makes them aware of the role medium plays in aesthetic development and production. Students will leave with a far sharper understanding of how the interpretive tools used in the humanities can be extended to include new media, and with a sense of the historical role video games have played and will continue to play in global cultural production. Because the course is historically focused, it will spend significant time looking at the differential development of video games in three major regions: the United States, Europe, and East Asia (especially Japan). T R 9:05-10:20 Camila Gutierrez Fuentes, M W F 1:25-2:15 Molly Appel

CMLIT 400: Senior Seminar in Literary Criticism and Theory:

Discussions of theories of literature, of literary criticism, and particularly of the distinct methods of comparative study; individual projects. T R 12:05-1:20 Nergis Erturk Lennon

CMLIT 403: Latina/o Literature and Culture:

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. This course provides students with a multi-faceted comparative view of Latina/o literature in relation to other forms of cultural expression. First, the course presents a variety of cultural expressions to students in an effort to teach them the different ways that form affects content. Each text will be studied in its historical context as well, thereby providing students with a sense of Latina/o cultural history. Second, this course compares works from within the same genre, allowing students to recognize the ways that Latina/o culture has worked to build identity, to deconstruct identity, and to challenge cultural stereotypes. Such comparison further facilitates comparison of the ways that different cultural forms have been used by diverse Latina/o communities. Third, this course compares cultural forms, allowing students to see how Latina/o poetry affects music or how Latina/o theater affects novels Fourth, this course will include texts that represent a variety of linguistic and national contexts, including many countries in Latin America, thereby allowing students to see the relationship between history, culture, language, geography, and identity. These are all themes that are at the center of both Latina/o Studies and Comparative Literature. T R 10:35-11:50 John Ochoa

CMLIT 415: World Graphic Novels:

This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements.This course considers the graphic novel (also known as graphic fiction, comics, or sequential narrative) as an emergent literary medium and global phenomenon. The course focuses on texts that engage issues of contemporary identity, ethnicity, sexuality, technology, and/or history (personal, family, and national). These graphic novels engage these issues through the medium of text joined with image. This course explores the aesthetic of sequential narrative, its methods of production and consumption, and its place in a contemporary culture of reading. Assigned texts include titles from the United States, France, Japan, Italy, Canada and Norway. All texts will be read in English translation. T R 12:05-1:20 Caroline Eckhardt

CMLIT 429: New Media and Literature:

New media literary genres; critical discussion of creative works in digital media. M W F 12:20-1:10 Brian Lennon