You are here: Home / Undergraduate / Courses

Fall 2017 Courses

CMLIT 004: Asian Literature:

This course is designed to act as a gateway to Asian literatures and cultures—in English translation—of selected fictional and cinematic texts from Japanese, Chinese, Korean, and Asian diaspora literature (our main focus is on literature of modern Asia, and Japanese literature). Exploring the historical and cultural contexts of each work, we will pay attention to the ways in which each text depicts the diversities within geographical areas. The cross/inter-cultural approach used in this course invites students to acquire a global perspective on the rich traditions of Asian literatures, films, and cultures. T R 10:35-11:50 Reiko Tachibana

CMLIT 010: World Literatures:

This course is an introduction to World Literature and includes the reading and interpretation of selected works of literature from diverse parts of the world. This class helps you discover the connections between literatures created in different geographies. These connections will aid you in considering the universality of themes such as power, gender, heroism, globalization, and encounter with the foreign.  We will trace world in seven areas:  Indic, East Asian, Mediterranean, African, European, Nordic and Americans spheres. T R 10:35-11:50 Anna Ziajka Stanton, T R 10:35-11:50 Magali Armillas-Tiseyra

CMLIT 011: Heroic Literature:

Traditional heroes, their traits and adventures; typical themes and examples chosen from the epics and sagas of world literature. M W F 2:30-3:20 Elizabeth Hayton Liendo

CMLIT 100: Comparative Literature:

This course offers a survey of several different cultural traditions as expressed in myth, as well as discussion of myth in its literary, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts. Various theories of the evolution and analysis of myth will be examined. Mythological traditions from around the globe will be compared in order to determine qualities which they share and examine ways in which they are unique. This course will help you see the world in new and exciting ways, based on the wide variety of global myths. At the same time, you will consider the permanent human issues which connect all of these traditions to each other, to the modern world, and to you. M W F 1:25-2:15 Hoda El Shakry, T R 12:05-1:20 Charlotte Eubanks

CMLIT 101: Race, Gender, Identity:

This course examines issues of race, gender, religions, and ethnicity as expressed in literary, social, and cultural contexts. We will address these questions in works from a variety of traditions and time periods. Literary works from around the world show a wide range of response to the Other -- idealization of difference as exotic, fear of difference as threat, the desire to suppress difference or force it into conformity, the recognition of difference within ourselves, etc. The scope includes authors who are themselves members of racial, sexual or ethnic groups with which you may be less familiar. You will also consider the question of who and what constitutes identity as perceived by oneself and by others. M W F 10:10-11:00 Max Jensen

CMLIT 105: Literary Humor:

One of the most important trends of our time is the increasing emphasis on globalization. This course offers an international, intercultural approach to the study of literature, crossing the boundaries of time, place, nationalities, languages, and cultures. The range of literature taught in Comparative Literature as a discipline draws from every continent of the globe and from the ideas, experiences, and inspiration of women and men across thousands of years. With an entire world of literature to choose from, the content of the course varies with the expertise and interests of the faculty member. Each seminar focuses on a specific topic that highlights the nature of literary study and research, presents debates in the discipline, and opens the way to further investigations. T R 10:35-11:50 Brice Peterson

CMLIT 106: Arthurian Legend:

This course is designed to familiarize students with the legends about and surrounding King Arthur and the Round Table fellowship. Through a series of readings, students will survey the development of the legends of Arthur from their beginnings in early medieval Europe to their modern adaptations in many cultures around the world. The Arthurian legend is an ideal vehicle for showing the ways in which literary works capture and express changing value systems in different cultural and historical situations, and thus the course is a good example of comparative (international) approaches to literary study. Classes will discuss the changing cultural' ideals represented, the different characterizations of the central figures, and the literary, techniques employed. Lectures and discussions will be supplemented by music, and films dealing with Arthurian themes. T R 9:05-10:20 Samuel McMillan

CMLIT 107: Exploration, Travel, Migration, Exile:

CMLIT 107 compares the literatures of travel and exploration from ancient times to the future, from narratives of journeys actually experienced through narratives of journeys imagined in the mind. The notion of the journey is broadly defined as encompassing both literal and metaphorical experiences, including travel journals and diaries, epic adventures, quests of introspection, dreams and visions, and depictions of the future. You will examine and compare the different roles that travel can play in the imaginations of both the individual writers and the cultures from which they come. The journeys of this course, which vary greatly from each other, will also allow you to consider some of the vast unknowns of the individual human mind and imagination. T R 12:05-1:20 Nergis Erturk Lennon

CMLIT 108: Mythology:

This course offers a survey of several different cultural traditions as expressed in myth, as well as discussion of myth in its literary, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts. Various theories of the evolution and analysis of myth will be examined. Mythological traditions from around the globe will be compared in order to determine qualities which they share and examine ways in which they are unique. This course will help you see the world in new and exciting ways, based on the wide variety of global myths. At the same time, you will consider the permanent human issues which connect all of these traditions to each other, to the modern world, and to you. M W 4:00-5:15 Sydney Aboul-Hosn

CMLIT 130: Banned Books:

This course examines one of the most documented events in the history of book reception— the banning of books. Bannings provide a useful window onto the myriad functions of culture in social identity formation. In order to understand how and why offense is given and taken, students will learn to place texts in a specific context of their historical production and reception and also to extrapolate connections between disparate moments when taboos were named. Incorporating examples from a range of global systems of censorship, the course examines differences in the modes and effects of repression and the sometimes surprising connections between church and monarchy, fascism and democracy. This course raises the following questions:-How has censorship been justified? When, if ever, is censorship justifiable?-Who censors? Who is censored? M W F 10:10-11:00 Morgan Bozick

CMLIT 131: Crime and Detection:

This course studies the origins and development of crime and detective literature from an international and interdisciplinary perspective. Beginning with early Greek tragedies, the course traces literature's investment in issues of crime, violence, detection, forensics, and social justice through a variety of historical and cultural contexts; this may include the classical era, the early modern period, the Enlightenment, the industrial era, and the modern/ contemporary world. Some of the questions addressed may include reigning myths about law and order; the rise of urban societies and mass culture; the construction of the detective figure, the witness, the criminal, and the victim as models of subjectivity; issues of gender and sexual violence; and the nature of justice. Students will learn about the history of the idea of crime and its relationship with literary form. They will develop ideas about the contribution of literary thinking to ideas of social justice, as well as a theory of genre and its development over time; they will recognize regional, cultural, and historical differences and forms of change that affect the intellectual development of literature and detection alike. They will practice and master these skills through class discussion, short papers, and/or quizzes and exams. T R 3:05-4:20 Magali Armillas-Tiseyra

CMLIT 142: Psychology of World Literature:

The Psychology of World Literature (3) (GH;IL) (BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements.This course explores various psychological approaches to the discussion of literature from the perspectives of writer, narrative, character and reader. Can authors, narrators, and fictitious characters be "psychoanalyzed"? To what extent do cultural variants affect a psychological approach to literature? Are there psychological universals that transcend time and culture? How does a an awareness of psychology affect the reader? All of these issues will be discussed and compared with an eye to speculating the ways in which the human mind creates literature and literature impacts the human mind. T R 9:05-10:20 Ian Thompson

CMLIT 143: Human Rights:

Human Rights refers to basic rights and freedoms to which all humans are entitled, often held to include the right to life and liberty, freedom of thought and expression, and equality before the law. Some scholars believe that without certain forms of literature today’s understanding of human rights would not exist. Through comparative analysis of a variety of human rights storytelling genres that reflect a range of contexts, this course will suggest that it is impossible to understand human rights without also thinking about the stories that create and sustain their idea. One main premise of this course is that the representation of human rights violations is always a vexed undertaking. T R 12:05-1:20 Ivana Ancic, Sophia McClennen

CMLIT 153: International Literature and Film:

This course will compare narrative and artistic techniques employed by literature and film in portraying different social and cultural environments, which will range widely around the globe. The purpose of this course is to have you examine how the selected artists have developed their intentions and their subject matter in their respective medium, literature or film, and to allow you to study modes of narration across different cultures and media. You will examine how narrative components, including plot, genre, environment, character, and point of view are developed in films and fiction from diverse cultures. The study of narrative technique will help students develop analytical skills in discussing and writing about the literary and cinematic expression of cultural values. T R 1:35-2:50 Elizabeth Schoppelrei

CMLIT 184: The Short Story:

Lectures, discussion, readings in translation, with primary emphasis on major writers of the nineteenth and twentieth century. M W F 10:10-11:00 Robert Hume

CMLIT 191: Video Game Culture:

Introduction to Video Game Culture (3) This course is a comparative introduction to the nature and history of video games as cultural artifacts, from Pong to online role-playing. It introduces students to academic discussion on and creative work in new digital forms including hypertexts, video games, cell phone novels, machinima, and more. Students will survey major debates over the meaning and value of video games, and study some of the major theoretical terms and perspectives developed to elaborate the cultural and sociological value of video games. The course extends students' skills in literary interpretation to a variety of new objects, and makes them aware of the role medium plays in aesthetic development and production. Students will leave with a far sharper understanding of how the interpretive tools used in the humanities can be extended to include new media, and with a sense of the historical role video games have played and will continue to play in global cultural production. Because the course is historically focused, it will spend significant time looking at the differential development of video games in three major regions: the United States, Europe, and East Asia (especially Japan). T R 9:05-10:20 Eric Hayot

CMLIT 400: Criticism and Theory:

Discussions of theories of literature, of literary criticism, and particularly of the distinct methods of comparative study; individual projects. T R 3:05-4:20 Nergis Erturk Lennon

CMLIT 429: New Media and Literature:

New media literary genres; critical discussion of creative works in digital media. M W F 11:15-12:05 Brian Lennon

CMLIT 449: Literature of Islam:

Literary Cultures of Islam (3-6) (IL) (BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements.This course is an advanced introduction to the literary cultures of the Islamic world, from the seventh century to the present. No prior knowledge is required. Works will be read in translation. Students will study the foundational text of Islam, the Quran, as a literary text, and learn about major genres of Islamic literatures (ghazal, masnavi, and maqamah, among others). They will also examine how these genres have been adapted in modern literature and media (novels, memoirs, and film). Supplementary historical readings will be provided to contextualize the primary texts. CMLIT 449 is one of the many courses which count toward the Comparative Literature major and the World Literature minor. T R 1:35-2:50 Anna Ziajka Stanton

CMLIT 453: Film and Literature:

Comparative study of the aesthetics and techniques of film and literature; close analyses of masters of each art form. T R 4:35-5:50 Kelly Lehtonen