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Hoda El Shakry

Hoda El Shakry

Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature

448 Burrowes Bldg.
Office Phone: (814) 865-7671

Curriculum Vitae

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Education:

  1. Ph.D., UCLA, 2012
  2. B.A., Rutgers University, 2001

Biography:

My research and teaching interests lie in contemporary literature, criticism, and visual culture from North Africa, with an emphasis on the relationship between aesthetics and ethics.  My scholarship traverses the fields of modern Arabic and Francophone Maghrebi literature, Mediterranean studies, gender and sexuality studies, Islam and secular criticism, as well as postcolonial studies and narrative theory.  In addition to translating Arabic literary criticism, I have written on such subjects as: queer theory and film, Islamic eschatology, Maghrebi critical theory, and the importance of Maghrebi studies to the field of Comparative Literature.  My research has been published/is forthcoming in GLQ; Journal of Arabic Literature; Contemporary French and Francophone Studies: SITES; ALIF: A Journal of Comparative Poetics; and Expression Maghrébin; in addition to an essay in the Routledge volume: Arabic Literature in the Classroom: Teaching Methods, Theories, Themes, and Texts.  My current book manuscript examines the influence of Qur'anic textual, hermeneutical, and philosophical traditions on Arabophone and Francophone fiction of Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia.  My forthcoming project is a critical cultural history of 20th century periodicals, that explores the visual, textual, and material dimensions of print culture in the Maghreb.  I serve on the Executive Committee for the MLA Forum on Arabic Literature and Culture.  Before joining Penn State, I was a Faculty Fellow at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University.

AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION

  • Modern Arab/ic Literature, Criticism & Visual Culture
  • Francophone North Africa & the Maghreb
  • Postcolonial Studies, Narrative Theory, Gender & Sexuality, Islam & Secular Criticism